Calendar of Events

Monday, October 18, 2021

Knoxville Walking Tours: Shadow Side Ghost Tours

  • October 14, 2021 — October 31, 2021

Category: Festivals, special events, History, heritage and Lecture, discussion, panel

While an early evening stroll through Old Gray will be quite interesting, it may not entirely satisfy your need for a good spooky story this October, but we know where you can find some! Book a ghost tour with Laura Still at Knoxville Walking Tours. There are three different tours to choose from, each with true tales of the spirits that haunt the streets and buildings of Knoxville.

Shadow Side Ghost Tours - Brave souls who enjoy a chill can join us for a trip into Knoxville's shadow side. The city's history of blood-stained streets echoing with gunfire is full of restless spirits. Visit their haunts and hear local legends of ghostly apparitions. Details & Tickets

Shadow Side Two: Ghosts of the Old City - Red Summer, drunken brawls, hot lead, and blood on the tracks. Knoxville's Old City used to be known as the bowery, where victims of murderous brawls, deadly shoot-outs, and horrific train crashes haunt the old buildings and back alleys along with the ghost of a musician who hasn't quite faded away. Details & Tickets

Side Street Shadows Ghost Tours - Hear more tales of ghostly history as you follow storyteller Laura Still on the Side Street Shadows tour. Find out who haunts the Farragut, how a gunfight on Cumberland nearly started a war, and where you might meet the courteous spirit of a scholar or the grumpy ghost of a violent rebel. Details & Tickets

E-Mail tours@knoxvillewalkingtours.com or call 865-309-4522 to book your tour today!

UT School of Art: Mapping Home / Collecting Truths: Works by Indigenous and International Artists

Category: Exhibitions, visual art, Free event and History, heritage

The University of Tennessee School of Art is hosting Navajo artist and University of Colorado Professor, Melanie Yazzie, September 20– 24, for a series of activities on campus.

Mapping Home / Collecting Truths: Works by Indigenous and International Artists, an exhibition organized by Yazzie with prints by 35 indigenous and international artists, addressing ideas of homeland and its intersection with the environment, climate, or other influences. https://www.colorado.edu/libraries/2018/10/08/mapping-home-collecting-truths-works-indigenous-and-international-artists

About her work Yazzie writes: “The Navajo Paradigm in which we create the world with our thoughts, grounds and motivates my work as an artist, as a teacher, an Indigenous person who is a member of the Navajo Nation, and asPoster for Mapping Home/Collecting Truth Showcase faculty of the University of Colorado. The key themes and processes central to my work include: outreach to rural communities on the local, national, and global level with Indigenous people, colonization, the idea of homeland, nature, the female archetype, and issues relating to health and safety. My intellectual, creative, classroom, and outreach is rooted in the fact that we learn from one another, through our shared experience in the practice of art-making, an ancient, sustainable way of both being in the world, and a way in which to live together, always in a state of learning. Of principal research interest is our diverse yet shared foundational, theoretical, and philosophical bodies of knowledge that express our connections to our homelands.”

On view in the Printmaking Showcase Gallery on the second floor of the Art and Architecture Building
UT Campus
https://art.utk.edu/melanie-yazzie-public-lecture-and-showcase/

East Tennessee Historical Society: Shaver: An Artist of Rare Merit

Category: Exhibitions, visual art and History, heritage

Portraits were the “social media posts” of the American colonial and antebellum periods. Today, social media allows users to not only visually document and share life’s moments but also curate how others see themselves. Early Tennessee portraits afforded the sitter the same duality. “They are,” as one art historian puts it, “the rhetoric–not the record–of self-representation.” As viewers two centuries removed, how are we to understand early portraiture in East Tennessee? Is it history, fiction, or perhaps a bit of both? This exhibition of works by Samuel M. Shaver, East Tennessee’s first native-born artist, provides interesting examples for discussion.

About Samuel M. Shaver (1816-1878)
Samuel Moore Shaver was the youngest or next to youngest child born to David and Catherine Barringer Shaver on Reedy Creek (near present-day Kingsport) in 1816. Little is known about his formative years. He may have studied at Jefferson Academy in Blountville; a Leonidas Shaver is listed as a teacher there, and his older brother David, Jr., operated a tavern nearby. In 1833, William Harrison Scarborough (1812-1871), a traveling portrait painter from Middle Tennessee, visited Sullivan County. What impact did Scarborough’s stay have on 17-year-old Shaver? Did he watch Scarborough paint the portraits of his neighbors? Or did he simply benefit by imitating the works Scarborough left behind? Whether by native talent, with formal instruction, or both, Shaver possessed the skill set to begin producing competently done portraits by the late 1830s.

Shaver: An Artist of Rare Merit traces the artist's maturation through the 19 portraits held by the East Tennessee Historical Society and the Calvin M. McClung Historical Collection, Knox County Public Library. The exhibition is organized on the occasion of three recent Shaver acquisitions, making the East Tennessee History Center the largest repository of the artist's works.

East Tennessee Historical Society, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville, TN 37902. Museum hours: M-F 9-4, Sa 10-4, Su 1-5. Information: 865-215-8824, www.easttnhistory.org

Knoxville Walking Tours

  • January 1, 2021 — December 31, 2021

Category: Festivals, special events and History, heritage

Are you looking for a safe and engaging outdoor activity during the pandemic? Take a historical tour of downtown Knoxville – its past, its present, and most of all its people - with poet and storyteller Laura Still with Knoxville Walking Tours.

Laura opens a window to Knoxville’s varied past and leads you on a journey through hard times and high times of a city growing through more than two centuries of history.

Tours include:
• Knoxville: The Early Years
• Misbehaving Women
• Civil War
• Gunslingers
• Musical History
• Literary Heritage
• Shadow Side Ghost Tours

A portion of all downtown tours support the Knoxville History Project. You can schedule your tour at http://knoxvillewalkingtours.com/.

Haunted Knoxville Ghost Tours: COVID-19 Program

  • May 1, 2020 — December 31, 2021

Category: Festivals, special events and History, heritage

Since 2010, Haunted Knoxville Ghost Tours have created the highest level of enjoyment. With the hard times we are facing as a country, we feel that entertainment IS 100% essential. Getting out of the house, enjoying the outdoors with loved-ones is extremely beneficial to personal health.
With this being said, we have decided to adjust our Tours operation so we can offer service to the public, while also maintaining social distancing requirement.
Public Tours are postponed till social distancing requirements are lifted. (RESCHEDULES will be available once social distancing requirements are lifted.)
Private Tours will be offered for “Households” and social circles. (We have decided to offer these events to individuals who spend time in close proximity of each other.) This is a great solution for slowing the spread of the virus while also offering activities that can bring enjoyment to families in the community.

Information: 865-377-9677 or www.hauntedknoxville.net