Calendar of Events

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts: 70th Annual Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage Artist of the Year

Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Fine Crafts and Free event

Featuring Alex Foster

Reception: Wednesday, April 22, 2020, 5-7pm, free and open to the public

Geoffrey A. Wolpert Gallery, Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts. Gallery hours: M-R 8:30-5, Fri 8:30-4, Saturdays call ahead. Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, 556 Parkway, Gatlinburg, TN 37738. Information: 865-436-5860, www.arrowmont.org

Knoxville Museum of Art: Dine & Discover

Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Free event and Lectures

CANCELLED / POSTPONED

With KMA Curator Stephen Wicks

"Creation of an Exhibition: Through the Unusual Door"

To order lunch, call 865-525-6101 x 227

Knoxville Museum of Art, 1050 World's Fair Park Dr, Knoxville, TN 37916. Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10AM-5PM, Sunday, 1-5PM. Information: 865-525-6101, www.knoxart.org

Oak Ridge Art Center: Through the Lens

Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Fine Crafts and Free event

POSTPONED

Through the Lens: Recent Photographs by Regional Artists. All types of photography are welcome.

Oak Ridge Art Center, 201 Badger Avenue, Oak Ridge, TN 37830. Hours: Tu-F 9-5, Sa-M 1-4. Information: 865-482-1441, www.oakridgeartcenter.org

Pellissippi State: Annual Studio Art Juried Exhibition

Category: Exhibitions & visual art and Free event

CANCELLED

Some of the best and brightest Pellissippi State student artists will show how they’re mastering their medium in this juried exhibition.

Hardin Valley Campus of Pellissippi State: 10915 Hardin Valley Road, Knoxville, TN 37932. Bagwell Center Gallery hours: M-F 9 AM - 9 PM. Information: 865-694-6405, www.pstcc.edu/arts

Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts: AIR Exhibition—2019-2020 Artists-in-Residence

Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Fine Crafts and Free event

Featuring the works of Eric Cannizzaro, Maggie Connolly, Luke Huling, Jolynn Santiago and Alex Younger

-- Reception: Friday, May 15, 2020, from 6-8 pm, free and open to the public

Sandra J. Blain Galleries, Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts. Gallery hours: M-R 8:30-5, Fri 8:30-4, Saturdays call ahead. Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, 556 Parkway, Gatlinburg, TN 37738. Information: 865-436-5860, www.arrowmont.org

Fountain City Art Center: FCAC Student Show**

Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Free event and Kids & family

Reception: March 13, 6:30 – 8:00 PM

Fountain City Art Center, 213 Hotel Ave, Knoxville, TN 37918. Hours: Tu-Th 9-5, or by appointment. Information: 865-357-2787, www.fountaincityartcenter.com

Westminister Presbyterian Church: Dee Blane's Collection of African Artifacts**

  • March 5, 2020 — April 30, 2020

Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Fine Crafts and Free event

Westminster Presbyterian Church Schilling Gallery

6500 S Northshore Dr, Knoxville, TN 37919. Hours: M-R 9-4, Fri 9-12. Info: (865) 584-3957 or www.wpcknox.org

Westminister Presbyterian Church: Pond Study by Frank Norris**

  • March 1, 2020 — April 30, 2020

Category: Exhibitions & visual art and Free event

Artist: Frank Norris
“Pond Study” - Seeing nature through a different lens
Category: Photography

Westminister Presbyterian Church, 6500 S Northshore Dr, Knoxville, TN 37919. Hours: M-R 9-4, Fri 9-12. Info: (865) 584-3957 or www.wpcknox.org

East Tennessee Historical Society: Black & White: Knoxville in the Jim Crow Era

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Category: Exhibitions & visual art, History & heritage and Kids & family

Knoxville occupies a unique place in the American South. Following the Civil War, residents felt it was one of the few racially tolerant cities in the region. Unlike most cities in the South, African Americans in Knoxville could vote, hold public office, serve as police officers, and sit on juries. Despite this, racial tensions still held the city captive, and life for black citizens was not the same as that for white citizens.

Despite Jim Crow laws and segregation that dictated much of the interaction between black and white citizens, African American artists carved out a place for themselves in Knoxville. A new feature exhibition Black & White: Knoxville in the Jim Crow Era at the Museum of East Tennessee History, explores what life was like for African Americans in Knoxville during the Jim Crow era. This exhibition, presented as a timeline, provides historical context to the lives of local African American artists Beauford Delaney, Joseph Delaney, and Ruth Cobb Brice. It seeks to answer what influence the city had on the early lives of these artists and whether they could succeed without leaving home.

The exhibition includes 66 artifacts highlighting the history of race relations, African American art, and the development of an art community in Knoxville following the Civil War. We encourage patrons to view the exhibition in tandem with the Knoxville Museum of Art exhibition Through the Unusual Door (through May 7, 2020), which provides a groundbreaking look at Beauford Delaney and his creative exchange with writer James Baldwin.

East Tennessee Historical Society, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville, TN 37902. Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday; 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Saturday; and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Sunday. Museum admission is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, and FREE for children under 16. Each Sunday admission is FREE to all and ETHS members always receive FREE admission. Information: 865-215-8824, www.easttnhistory.org

Knoxville Museum of Art: Beauford Delaney and James Baldwin: Through the Unusual Door

Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Free event and History & heritage

This exhibition of 50+ paintings, works on paper, and unpublished archival material examines the 38-year relationship between painter Beauford Delaney (Knoxville 1901-1979 Paris) and writer James Baldwin (New York 1924-1987 Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France) and the ways their ongoing intellectual exchange shaped one another’s creative output and worldview.

Through the Unusual Door seeks to identify and disentangle the skein of influences that grew over and around a rich, complex lifetime relationship with a selection of Delaney’s works that reflects the powerful presence of Baldwin in Delaney’s life. The exhibition draws from the KMA’s extensive Delaney holdings, public and private collections around the country, and rarely displayed papers held by the Delaney estate. KMA curator Stephen Wicks is organizing the exhibition, which is accompanied by a color-illustrated catalogue published by the University of Tennessee Press.

The KMA is proud to hold the world’s largest public collection of work by Knoxville native Beauford Delaney, who overcame poverty, racial discrimination, and mental illness to achieve international renown. The young Delaney’s precocious talent was recognized by Lloyd Branson, Knoxville’s first full-time professional artist, who mentored Beauford and his brother Joseph. By 1929, Beauford Delaney had settled in New York where he attracted a distinguished circle of cultural luminaries that included Georgia O’Keeffe and Henry Miller, but it was the much younger James Baldwin who had the most significant influence on the artist. Baldwin found in Delaney a father figure, muse, and model of perseverance as a gay man of color. Delaney found in Baldwin a powerful intellectual and spiritual anchor who inspired some of his finest works. Encouraged by Baldwin, Delaney left New York in 1953 and settled in Paris, where he lived until his death in 1979 and where artist and writer continued their long and mutually beneficial relationship. Through the Unusual Door presents the story of Baldwin and Delaney in a way that inspires reconsideration of their life circumstances and raises important questions about the nature of the racial and sexual identity barriers they faced.

The exhibition title Through the Unusual Door comes from a passage in Baldwin’s volume of collected essays The Price of the Ticket (1985) describing the author’s reaction to his initial encounter with Delaney in the doorway of the artist’s Greenwich Village studio: “Lord, I was to hear Beauford sing, later, and for many years, open the unusual door... I walked through that door into Beauford’s colors.” This first meeting encapsulates Delaney’s transformational effect on Baldwin’s view of himself and the world he lived in, and set the tone for the painter’s role in the author’s life as a father figure and mentor. Baldwin, in turn, inspired Delaney with his fearless social conscience and commitment to civil rights causes. They helped each other to move beyond the pain and oppression imposed on them by the world.

While no other figure in Beauford Delaney’s extensive social orbit approaches James Baldwin in the extent and duration of influence, none of the major exhibitions of Delaney’s work has explored in any depth the creative exchange between the two. Previous scholarship has almost exclusively emphasized the artist’s stylistic evolution from the 1940s to the 1960s as a function of his move from New York to Paris. Through the Unusual Door posits the idea that this profound stylistic change was in part inspired by the intellectual and personal relationship between Delaney and Baldwin. Ordinary daily observations--reflections in puddles in the streets of Greenwich village or the quality of light filtered through the window of Delaney’s studio in the Paris suburb of Clamart--sparked extraordinary creative exchanges between the two. The exhibition incorporates previously unpublished archival materials and artworks that promise to extend the understanding of Delaney’s aesthetic agenda and range and reveal the extent of his ties to Baldwin.

Acquiring and showing the work of Knoxville native Beauford Delaney has been a longstanding institutional priority for the Knoxville Museum of Art.

Knoxville Museum of Art, 1050 World's Fair Park Dr, Knoxville, TN 37916. Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10AM-5PM, Sunday, 1-5PM. Information: 865-525-6101, www.knoxart.org

McClung Museum: Visions of the End Exhibition

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Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Free event and History & heritage

Visions of the End explores the Apocalypse through captivating artworks inspired by the writings of John of Patmos, who wrote the Book of Revelation around 100 C.E.

The exhibition features twenty-six pieces of medieval and Renaissance art from some of the country’s finest collecting institutions, including the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Glencairn Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Morgan Library and Museum, the National Gallery of Art, and the Walters Art Museum, offering visitors a rare chance to explore medieval and Renaissance art of the Apocalypse in works never before displayed in Tennessee.

Recoiling from frightful threats and aspiring for eternal salvation, medieval and Renaissance artists produced carvings, metalwork, woodcuts, stained glass windows, and illuminated manuscripts that matched fears about the final days with promises of renewal.

In coordination with the exhibition, UT’s College of Arts and Sciences has organized a comprehensive “apocalypse semester” that includes specialized courses, lectures, and events for community members. The interdisciplinary nature of Visions of the End and its many collaborative events reflects how apocalypse has historically been understood.

McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture, 1327 Circle Park Dr on the UT campus, Knoxville, TN 37996. Hours: Monday-Saturday, 9AM-5PM, Sunday, 1-5PM. Information: 865-974-2144, http://mcclungmuseum.utk.edu