Calendar of Events

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

The Emporium Center: Karen Ann DuGuay: Following your inner voice

Category: Exhibitions & visual art and Free event

A reception will take place on Friday, January 4, from 5:00-9:00 PM as part of First Friday activities.

As a child, Karen Ann DuGuay’s mother shared with her a passion for drawing. She showed DuGuay how to understand composition, lighting and color balance by studying the Masters. She also taught Karen by a technique referred to as “master copy drawing”. DuGuay’s natural curiosity and these early lessons honed her skills in “seeing” and expressing her artistic vision. Over the years, her artistic talent has been expressed in media such as drawing, painting and ceramics. She is always seeking new ways to express herself artistically.

After moving to Tennessee in 2014, DuGuay began hiking in nearby Great Smoky Mountains National Park. On her hikes, she would hear an inner voice urging her to follow a sound, a ray of light or even the wind. The voice would say, “There’s something there, there’s something to this.” Sometimes it is a snail smaller than a pea making its way across a rock; at other times it is a 200-year old Beech tree highlighted by the early morning sun. They each have something to say, something to share. DuGuay’s photographs give them a stage, a venue, a spotlight to be seen and heard. In the fall of 2017, she traveled across the United States exploring landscapes, cityscapes and street photography. Wherever life takes her, she always listens to that inner voice… “there’s something there”.

In this exhibition, DuGuay will feature photographs of the things she has been drawn to on her travels. She hopes viewers will be moved to follow their inner voice, pause and take notice, and “see” more closely the world around us. For more information, visit https://www.pinterest.com/KarenADuGuay/karens-photographs/.

Please note, the Emporium will be closed Monday, January 21, for the holiday.

On display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM. Information: (865) 523-7543 or www.knoxalliance.com.

The Emporium Center: Bill Capshaw: The Journey

Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Fine Crafts and Free event

A reception will take place on Friday, January 4, from 5:00-9:00 PM as part of First Friday activities.

Artist statement: The works are representative of my life. As an artist, we focus on the piece on which we are working and try not to get to the end until the end reveals itself. At that time, you know it is complete, and the next piece now demands your full attention. Sometimes you know where to start; other times you have no idea. So you began to work, discover, create, manipulate, study, and attempt all those things that support your energy in making your art. Works represent my beginning and where I am now. There are many influences that have inspired me along the way: the many artists I know, my students, my teachers, and life. Emotionally-filled with so much information, yet not consumed by it. The good, bad, and unexplained continuously invade the thinking. And here we are today thinking about where we are heading now.

Bill Capshaw earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Ceramics in 1971 and a Master of Fine Arts in Printing Processes in 1974 from East Tennessee State University. He worked for Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC from 1977-2007 as a Government Printing Office Specialist as well as served as an adjunct faculty member at Pellissippi State Technical Community College. For more than 30 years, he has served as Pottery Chair and Instructor of the Oak Ridge Art Center. Capshaw has volunteered with the Tennessee Arts Commission to review grant applications for At-Risk Youth and other grant programs. He has conducted workshops at the Appalachian Center for Craft, Arrowmont School, Vanderbilt University, Virginia Intermont College, Oak Ridge Art Center, Children’s Museum of Oak Ridge, and various area middle and high schools. Capshaw’s works have been included in the Governor’s Inaugural Ball, countless fundraisers, private collections, and permanent collections such as ETSU Slocum Gallery, Tennessee Arts Commission, and Huntsville Fine Arts Museum. He has had solo and group shows with Blue Spiral 1 (Asheville), Rodman Townsend Gallery, Johnson City Arts Council, Kingsport Fine Arts Center, Smithsonian Institute, Tennessee State Museum, Vanderbilt University, Joe L. Evins Appalachian Center for Crafts, and many others. His work is displayed and sold with Highland Craft Shop in Gatlinburg, Norris Craft Center, and Folk Art Center in Asheville. He is a member of Foothills Craft Guild, Southern Highlands Craft Guild, Appalachian Arts and Craft Center, and Tennessee Association of Craft Artists, at whose fairs he has held numerous demonstrations.

Please note, the Emporium will be closed Monday, January 21, for the holiday.

On display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM. Information: (865) 523-7543 or www.knoxalliance.com.

The Emporium Center: Chris Hornsby: Fracture-Recontextualized

Category: Exhibitions & visual art and Free event

A reception will take place on Friday, January 4, from 5:00-9:00 PM as part of First Friday activities.

Fracture-Recontextualized is an experiment that joins Chris Hornsby's pre-existing paintings into larger, more complex compositions. Hornsby explains: "I was inspired by the kinetic technique of Alexander Calder’s mobiles and how he overcame the static nature of art. The modular forms I’ve conceived within each of my paintings have the potential to continually vary and evolve through perpetual redesign and placement. They are not fixed entities, but objects of change. With every fluid unfolding, I believe they are the embodiment of performance and installation art. The modularity of my forms opens the door to the possibility of co-creative art, in which collectors/exhibitors/other artists and I collaborate to jointly determine the appearance of the work. This collective evolution, with each turn of recomposing and decomposing, offers an alternative perspective and interpretation. The original paintings can be re-contextualized by the rearranging of their parts, thereby providing unlimited possibilities not yet imagined.”

Chris Hornsby’s creative passion permeates his professional and personal life in a variety of expressions. Having studied graphic design at the University of Georgia in Athens, he has worked with a host of ad agencies and design studios across the Southeast, including those in Atlanta, Knoxville, and Mississippi. In 2003, he launched his own creative firm, Hornsby Brand Design, LLC. This AAF (American Advertising Federation) Hall of Fame inductee answers each of his professional challenges with creative solutions that not only achieve results, but also break the ground of conventionalism. He’s garnered more than a 130 local and international design awards for his creative solutions, along with being published in several prestigious design annuals. Hornsby has cultivated his many years of design experience through producing superior creative work from corporate identity and websites to TV commercials. In addition, Hornsby, the fine artist, enjoys the freedom and renewed energy that comes from creating his own personal artistic expressions. His pieces range from installation art to paintings and sculptures. As a problem solver, he also enjoys the technical challenges that come with installation art as well. His work has appeared in museums, exhibitions, and has been displayed in numerous venues.

For more information, visit www.hornsby.gallery or follow him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/hornsby_gallery.

Please note, the Emporium will be closed Monday, January 21, for the holiday.

On display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM. Information: (865) 523-7543 or www.knoxalliance.com.

The Emporium Center: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission Gallery of Arts Tribute

Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Fine Crafts and Free event

A reception will take place on Friday, January 4, from 5:00-9:00 PM as part of First Friday activities.

The MLK Gallery of Arts Tribute exhibition will kick-off the 2019 King Week Celebration (January 16-21, 2019). The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission is partnering with the Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville to provide this fifth annual exhibition. The Galley of Arts Tribute is a juried exhibition developed to recognize local artists and, most importantly, honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The exhibit will feature works by local artists reflecting the 2019 theme, The Courage to Lead with a Greater Determination. Works in the exhibitions may also be a reflection of the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and have pertinence to the themes of Unity, Community, Love, Reconciliation, Social Justice, and Civil Rights. For more information, please visit http://www.mlkknoxville.com/.

Please note, the Emporium will be closed Monday, January 21, for the holiday.

On display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM. Information: (865) 523-7543 or www.knoxalliance.com.

Tennessee Valley Unitarian Universalist Church: Exhibit by Ken Moffett & Kate Aubrey

  • December 16, 2018 — February 13, 2019

Category: Exhibitions & visual art and Free event

Free and open to the public
Reception Friday, January 11, 6:00 to 7:30 pm. Artists’ talks at 6:30 pm.

Ken Moffett: Recent Work in Acrylic on Canvas
This work since 2010 represents an ongoing examination of the potential for artistic expression when limited to form, line and color. Representational aspects can seem to appear in some of these paintings, but the intent has always been to use nonobjective means. Emotive content is an inevitable and welcome outcome, some works being fractious, others calm, some brooding and others “optimistic” in tone. An early exposure to so-called abstract expressionism clearly had an influence. In all cases, the titles were chosen after completion of the work. While the approach may appear limiting, I have found a rewarding wealth of opportunities for intriguing compositional developments. Inevitably, my career in architecture may have had an influence on some of these compositions, though in general I have tried to regard these paintings as an opportunity to “work on something completely different.”

Moffett began creating and studying art in his youth while residing in Missouri, Oklahoma and Virginia, and continued at the College of Wooster in Ohio and the School of Design at North Carolina State University, where he received his degree in architecture. His watercolor paintings have been chosen for exhibit in Ohio, Massachusetts, Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee, and are included in a number of private collections. An exhibit at the Emporium Gallery in 2010 featured work in acrylics and other media, and his paintings have been included in Knoxville’s “Art in the Airport.” A Knoxville resident since 1975, Moffett was awarded the Gold Medal of the East Tennessee Chapter of the American Institute of Architects in 2002. A retrospective exhibit of his architectural firm’s work is on exhibit at the UTK Art & Architecture Building, December 3 - January 25.


Kate Aubrey
I love to paint. It’s like breathing, only better. Or perhaps it is like life. What could teach me more quickly or thoroughly than watercolor the necessity of making mistakes if I would create something truly new? Or the need I have for discomfort in order to be willing to grow? Watercolor is my first and foremost choice of media precisely because it doesn’t just do what it’s told. There is a certain mischief in it. Every time I put brush to paper I discover something new — whether I intend to or not.

A devoted watercolorist for 40 years, Aubrey has studied with such notable artists as Charles Reid, Carol Orr, Don Andrews, Lian Quan Zhen, Mike Bailey, Ted Nuttall, Mary Moquin, Jeannie McGuire, and Stephen Quiller. She has won numerous awards in her travels and was named a finalist in The Artists Magazine’s Over 60 Competition of 2013 for her painting “Invisible.” Since arriving in the Knoxville area in 2014, Aubrey has taught several workshops in Tennessee and Nevada, is Vice President of the Knoxville Watercolor Society, and is a member of the Artists Guild of Tellico Village, the Fountain City Art Center, the Tennessee Artist’s Association, the Southern Watercolor Society, and the Arts Alliance of Knoxville. Her paintings have been accepted into several shows, including the Oak Ridge Art Center’s Annual Juried Shows of 2014 and 2015, winning awards each year, and The Arts and Culture Alliance’s National Juried Exhibition of 2016. She won awards in the 2016 and 2017 Southern Watercolor Society Juried Exhibits, and her painting “Old Soul, Dear Heart” took the top Jerry’s Artarama Purchase Award in the 2016 Tennessee Watercolor Society Biennial Exhibition.

Tennessee Valley Unitarian Universalist Church, 2931 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN 37919. Gallery hours: M-Th 10-5, Su 10-1. Information: 865-523-4176, www.tvuuc.org

Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts: AIR Mid-Residency Exhibition

Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Fine Crafts and Free event

Reception date TBA

In the Geoffrey A. Wolpert Gallery
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, 556 Parkway, Gatlinburg, TN 37738. Information: 865-436-5860, www.arrowmont.org

HoLa Hora Latina: Exhibition by Camila Manvaz

Category: Exhibitions & visual art and Free event

Opening reception Friday, December 7, 5pm-9pm

Camila Manvas’ Biography - Español:
A los 10 años, una niña colombiana de nombre Camila Manvaz, entra en contacto con el mundo del color y la plástica. Enamorada desde entonces de los Colores, empieza a realizar obras donde la fantasía y la realidad conviven en entorno a lo que nada es lo que parece. Obras que pretenden reflejar las inquietantes alucinaciones que produce su propia mente… La solución que encontró Camila para contrarrestar los efectos de sus repentinos y fuertes cambios anímicos fue sencillamente pintar aquello que veía. Camila Manvaz (Bogotá, Colombia, 1983), vive en las líneas que delimitan el paraíso y el infierno. El mundo artístico de una de las creadoras contemporáneas más fascinantes tiene su origen en las más profundas alegrías y depresiones que nunca la han abandonado. Pero como adulto, ella a logrado desplegar la belleza más especial ante los asombrados ojos del espectador. Su infancia, adolescencia y juventud transcurrieron en Bogotá Colombia, en la que las mujeres tienen poco o nada que decir y son fuertemente criticadas por una sociedad violenta y machista. En 2016, se muda a los Estados Unidos, a la ciudad de Knoxville, Tennessee, para buscar nuevas vías de expresión con las que dar salida a la vorágine artística que anida en su mente y en su espíritu. Camila Manvaz estudio diseño industrial en la Universidad Jorge Tadeo Lozano, y es actualmente una de las artistas colombianas contemporáneas con más fama, por su activismo social y derechos de la mujer. Compagina su actividad como Esposa, como madre de tres hijos, Gabriel, Jacobo y Victoria y como artista conceptual con la crítica pública a la desprotección a la mujer.

English:
At age 10, a Colombian girl named Camila Manvaz, came in contact with the world of color and plastic arts. Since then, she fell in love with the Colors, she began to create works where fantasy and reality coexisted in an environment where nothing is as it seems. Works that pretended to reflect the disturbing hallucinations produced by her own mind ... The solution that Camila found to counteract the effects of her sudden and strong mood changes was simply to paint what she saw. Camila Manvaz (Bogota, Colombia, 1983), lives in the borders that define paradise and hell. The artistic world of one of the most fascinating contemporary creators has its origins in the deepest joys and depressions that have never left her. But as an adult, she has managed to unfold the most special beauty for the astonished eyes of the spectator. Her childhood, adolescence and youth were spent in Bogota Colombia, a country in which women have little or nothing to say and are strongly criticized by a violent and macho society. In 2016, she moved to the United States, to the city of Knoxville, Tennessee, to find new ways of expression with which to give vent to the artistic maelstrom that nests in her mind and spirit. Camila Manvaz studied industrial design at the Jorge Tadeo Lozano University, and is currently one of the most famous contemporary Colombian artists, for her social activism and women's rights. She combines her activity as a wife, as a mother of three children, Gabriel, Jacobo and Victoria and as a conceptual artist with public criticism of the lack of protection for women.

Gallery will be closed for the Holidays from December 10 - January 2. We will be open M-F 1-5pm.

HoLa Hora Latina, 100 S. Gay Street, Suite 112, Knoxville, TN 37902. Information: 865-335-3358, www.holahoralatina.org

Beck Cultural Exchange Center: I Have a Voice: Tennessee’s African American Musical Heritage

  • November 2, 2018 — February 9, 2019

Category: Exhibitions & visual art, Free event, History & heritage and Music

Beck presents the exhibition, I Have a Voice: Tennessee’s African American Musical Heritage, opening November 2, 2018. The exhibition, organized by the Tennessee State Museum, gives a snapshot of Tennessee’s rich African American musical heritage and its influence on worldwide musical genres.

The Volunteer State has been the birthplace of some of the most influential music in the world, from the Beale Street blues clubs in Memphis, to the R&B scene on Nashville’s Jefferson Street and the jazz in Knoxville’s Gem Theatre. The history of African American music follows the hardship of slavery in America. American slaves adapted their African ancestors’ music to hand clapping, singing, the fiddle and the African–derived banjo.

Expressing their sorrows from bondage, and joy for their ultimate deliverance, these enslaved persons found an original, musical voice sung in their spirituals and folk music. This voice has left a monumental cultural stamp on American music, including blues, ragtime, jazz, gospel, rhythm and blues, rock and roll, and soul music. In turn, this music has influenced and enriched music around the world.

The exhibit introduces viewers to many famous Tennessee music legends — Bessie Smith, who was nicknamed the “Empress of the Blues;” B.B. King, often referred to as the “King of the Blues;” Grand Ole Opry star DeFord Bailey; and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Tina Turner. The exhibit gives visitors a chance to hear the voices of the many Tennessee African American men and women who made their mark on American music from ragtime to Motown.

Visitors can view YouTube videos of various performers and musicians featured in the exhibition on their smart phones or tablets through the use of QR-coded links. Educators who are interested in teaching about Tennessee’s African American musical heritage will be provided with curriculum-based educational lesson activities.

http://www.beckcenter.net/museum-exhibit-s/

Beck Cultural Exchange Center: 1927 Dandridge Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37915. Hours: Tu-Sa 10-6. Information: 865-524-8461, www.beckcenter.net

Frieson Black Cultural Center: Sacred and Profane by Marc Z. DeBose

  • October 29, 2018 — February 28, 2019

Category: Exhibitions & visual art and Free event

"Sacred and Profane" exhibition the Frieson Black Cultural Center

The art gallery at the Frieson Black Cultural Center is featuring "Sacred and Profane," a retrospective exhibition of mixed-media prints by Marc Z. DeBose. DeBose, who received his MFA in Studio Art (printmaking) in 2002, died unexpectedly on Monday April 2, 2018 from a ruptured aorta. Marc’s father Frank DeBose, who loaned most of the works for this exhibition, is Professor Emeritus in Visual Communication Design at the School of Art Institute of Chicago where Marc completed his BFA in printmaking, electronic art and photography in 1996. The exhibition is an opportunity to celebrate his creative spirit. The exhibition will run through February 28, 2019.

Several of the works in the exhibition are from Marc’s MFA thesis, which examined the African-American experience in relationship to community police-work. These works also express the influences of his synthesis of Catholic and Pentecostal roots on family and community interactions. Following his MFA degree, Marc Z, DeBose continued his studio practice while also pursuing a career as a Chicago policeman.

1800 Melrose Ave., Knoxville. https://art.utk.edu/mixed-media-prints-by-utk-alumnus-marc-z-debose-at-the-frieson-black-cultural-centerr/

Knoxville History Project: Upcoming Events

Category: Festivals & special events, Free event, Lectures and Literature & readings

We have so many programs and events that we are involved in, here’s a quick look at what’s coming up this week and beyond:

East Knoxville History - Talk and Discussion with Jack Neely
Town Hall East on Monday Jan. 14 at 7:00pm

Bob Booker Remembers the Civil Rights Era
Maple Hall on Thursday Jan. 17 at 6:30pm

Jack Neely in Conversation with author Jim McKairnes and his new book, All in the Decade
Union Ave. Books on Sunday Jan. 20 at 2:00pm

For more information on upcoming events, visit http://knoxvillehistoryproject.org/events/

HoLa Hora Latina: Frutos Latinos

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Category: Exhibitions & visual art and Free event

A unique exhibition by HoLa Hora Latina member artists celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month - one exhibition, two venues!

Opening Fri Sep 7, 5-9 PM at the Emporium

Then, on display at the Knoxville Museum of Art from Sep 19 - Oct 15 in the Kramer Education Center. Knoxville Museum of Art, 1050 World's Fair Park Dr, Knoxville, TN 37916. Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5, Su 1-5. Information: 865-525-6101, www.knoxart.org

Information: 865-335-3358, www.holahoralatina.org

Dogwood Arts: Art In Public Places

Category: Exhibitions & visual art and Free event

Dogwood Arts Art In Public Places - Temporary Sculpture Exhibition

Art in Public Places is a large-scale outdoor sculpture program showcased throughout Knoxville, Oak Ridge, and Alcoa, Tennessee. The annual rotating installation is one of many Dogwood Arts programs focused on providing access to the arts for everyone, promoting awareness of the strong visual arts community thriving in our region, and creating a vibrant and inspiring environment for residents and visitors to experience. Over the past eleven years, Dogwood Arts has curated and installed over 220 works of art, and the Art In Public Places program has gained national recognition as a platform for world-class artists. This year’s ambitious collection of sculptures created by artists from across the nation has been selected by Director of the Zuckerman Museum of Art, Justin Rabideau.

Dogwood Arts, 123 W. Jackson Ave, Knoxville, TN 37902. Information: 865-637-4561, www.dogwoodarts.com

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